Monthly Archives: September 2013

Santa Fe Neighborhoods – Focus on Tesuque

Santa Fe Neighborhoods – Focus on Tesuque

Tesuque is a neighborhood located 5 miles north of Santa Fe, east of Highway 285 on Bishops Lodge Road.  Tesuque is known for its beauty, verdant landscape and traditional adobe structures.  Tesuque owes its grassy fields and leafy orchards to Tesuque Creek which runs the length of the village. Many acequias nourish the yards of the houses that line the creek, creating a green oasis in the middle of a high country desert.  Abundant trees such as cottonwoods along the banks of the creek provide residents with soothing cool shade in the summer.

At the 2010 Census, Tesuque had a population of 925 with 718 housing units in a land area of 6.96 sq. miles giving it a population density of 162.63 people per square mile. The median household income as of the 2010 census was $104,487 and the average age was 56.3. Tesuque has its own post office and an elementary school.  

 
Local Amenities and Attractions
Tesuque Village Market

Tesuque Village Market

The popular Tesuque Village Market sits in the center of the village.  Built to resemble a trading post and stocked with grocery items, it serves breakfast, lunch and dinner 7 days a week.    Outdoor dinning on the porch (weather permitting) provides diners with entertaining people watching.  The breakfast burritos and green chile are particularly noteworthy at Tesuque Village Market and the pasteries are delicious.

Fresh pasteries at Tesuque Village Market

Fresh pasteries at Tesuque Village Market

Tesuque’s other restaurant El Nido is currently closed. El Nido, built in the 1920s, has a colorful history.  It first started out as a roadhouse and dance hall and was reputed to have been a brothel at one point.  In the past El Nido was popular with opera goers due to its proximity to the Santa Fe Opera.

Tesuque is also home to one of the top bronze art foundries in the United States, Shidoni Foundry, which was established in 1971.  Shidoni pours 3,500 pounds of bronze per week to make their bronze sculptures.  Shidoni holds weekly public demonstrations on sculpture making. Call (505) 988-8001 for the pouring schedule and plan to arrive a little early.  The pouring starts when the bronze is heated to 2000 degrees and ready to be poured into ceramic shells, which can be up to half an hour before the scheduled time.

Glass Flowers

Glass Flowers

The foundry has an 8 acre outdoor sculpture gallery showcasing sculptures in styles ranging from contemporary to traditional as well as two indoor galleries. Also on site is the Shidoni Arts Gallery which features works in glass and wood and Tesuque Glassworks where visitors can watch daily glassblowing demonstrations.

Tesuque Pueblo lies north and west of Tesuque, just 9 miles north of Santa Fe.  Archeologists believe that this pueblo has existed since at least 1,200 A.D.  Comprised of just 424 residents, this tiny pueblo is one of the most traditional Tewa speaking pueblos, with a great reverence for its traditional religious ceremonies.  Their dances are known for their authenticity and costumes.  Public dances include the Kings Dance held in January, the Corn Dance held in June, Harvest Dance held in November and the Deer and Buffalo Dances held in December.  The pueblo is closed to the public during certain days of the year, so call the pueblo before planning to visit. (505) 983-2667.

Tesuque Pueblo also operates the Tesuque Pueblo Flea Market, 6.5 miles north of Santa Fe, just off U.S. 84/285 at Exit 171, next to the Santa Fe Opera every weekend (Friday, Saturday and Sunday) from March to December.  Call (505) 670-2599 for more information

HOMES FOR SALE IN TESUQUE

If you would like to know more about homes for sale in the Tesuque neighborhood or for a free market analysis of what your Tesuque neighborhood home is worth, contact me, Karen Meredith, Keller Williams, by e-mail or at (505) 603-3036.    

Prices for homes in Tesuque currently range from the mid $400,000s to several million dollars.

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Santa Fe Neighborhoods – Focus on Bishops Lodge Road

 

Bishops Lodge Road
Bishops Lodge Road

Make a left on Paseo de Peralta onto Washington Avenue near the massive, pink, iconic Scottish Rite Temple and you find yourself heading north from the Santa Fe Plaza along the old stagecoach road to the Village of Tesuque.  Soon Washington Avenue turns into Bishops Lodge Road.  This 5 mile drive to Tesuque is one of the prettiest and most relaxing drives in Santa Fe. You’ll pass scenic hillsides and enter a cottonwood shaded lush valley filled with orchards and horse farms.  Along the way you will see some of the most expensive luxury homes in the Santa Fe style peppering the hillsides.

The Bishops Lodge Road neighborhood is one of Santa Fe’s older neighborhoods.  Well established, many of these homes enjoy beautiful views of the Sangre de Cristo, Jemez, Ortiz and Sandia mountain ranges as well as city light views.  Tucked away on dirt roads and nestled in the hillsides, these homes have privacy, yet are only minutes away from the Plaza.

Residents of Bishops Lodge Road have easy access to hiking in the Santa Fe National Forest, which has 1,500 contiguous square miles of territory nearby.

Bishop's Lodge Resort & Spa

Bishop’s Lodge Resort & Spa

Along the way to Tesuque you’ll pass the Bishop’s Lodge Ranch Resort & Spa, which was originally the home of Bishop Jean Baptiste Lamy.  Bishop Lamy was the first bishop appointed by the Vatican in 1850 for its newly created American southwest diocese, Vicariate of New Mexico.  He oversaw the creation of St. Francis Cathedral, at the end of East San Francisco Street, just off the Plaza, which he commissioned in 1869, and was very influencial in the development of Santa Fe and its surrounding areas in the mid 1800s.  The town of Lamy is named after Bishop Lamy for his work in bringing the railroad to that town and donating Church property for the railroad junction there.  Eventually becoming an Archbishop in 1875, Archbishop Lamy was the inspiration for the lead character in Willa Cather’s masterpiece, Death Comes for the Archbishop.

Horseback riding at Bishop's Lodge Ranch Resort & Spa

Horseback riding at Bishop’s Lodge Ranch Resort & Spa

Bishop’s Lodge Resort’s website states:  “Lamy enjoyed having visitors out to his lodge and his many guests were invited to partake in the pleasure of his gardens, orchard, fish-pond and the natural serenity of his country estate. In time, the path out to the ranch became a road and led the city’s newspaper to remark, “Good work has been done on the Bishop’s ranch road. It forms one of the best rides out of the city. This is the work, we presume, of Bishop Lamy.”

The New Mexico Governor’s Mansion also resides just off Bishop’s Lodge Road on 1 Mansion Way.  It was built in 1954 and is 7,949 square feet.

The Hills at Bishop’s Lodge is a new 45 acre residential luxury home and condominium development with amenities that include swimming, tennis and riding trails.

If you would like to know more about any of the homes for sale along Bishops Lodge Road neighborhood, or you would like a free market analysis of how much your home is worth, contact me, Karen MeredithKeller Williams Realty, by e-mail or at (505) 603-3036.

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Santa Fe Neighborhoods – Focus on Museum Hill

View from the Wheelwright Museum front terrace

View from the Wheelwright Museum front terrace

Santa Fe New Mexico Living– Focus on Museum Hill 

Santa Fe has four world class museums located on Camino Lejo on the southeast side of town in an area called Museum Hill.  If you limit your museum touring in Santa Fe to the cultural riches around the Plaza, you’ll be depriving yourself of a chance to view some wonderful art as well as magnificent views of the mountains.  Travel between Museum Hill and the Plaza is simple and convenient. Take the “M” line operated by Santa Fe Trails, which runs 7 seven days a week and costs adults $1 each way.  Departures start from the Downtown Transit Center on Sheridan Street (one block off the Plaza) for a short 18-minute ride.  Click here to see a map of the route.  Call 505 955-2001 for the most current information about schedules and fares.  You can spend endless hours exploring the wide variety of art in these collections.

Apache Mountain Spirit Dancer by Craig Dan Goseyun in front of the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture

Apache Mountain Spirit Dancer by Craig Dan Goseyun in front of the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture

The Museum of Indian Arts & Culture (710 Camino Lejo) covers 12,000 years of southwestern Native American culture and history in the long-term exhibit “Here, Now and Always”.  This groundbreaking exhibit, which opened in August, 1997, was developed over an eight year period by a curatorial team composed of Native American consultants and museum professionals.  It incorporates the voices of more than 50 Native Americans speakers and has over 1,000 artifacts and objects on display to help illustrate the rich, complex and diverse Native American stories of creation and survival in the Southwest.  Also on long-term display is the Buchsbaum Southwest Pottery Gallery which features 500 ceramic pieces from ancient times to today from each of the Pueblos of New Mexico and Arizona.  Call 505 476-1269 or click here for more information.

The Museum of International Folk Art (708 Camino Lejo) houses the largest collection of traditional folk art in the world.   With over 135,000 objects, the collection is displayed in four distinct wings and covers such diverse topics as folk art from Latin American mountain villages, metalwork from West Africa, intricate textiles from Southwest China and shadow-puppet traditions of Java.  Call 505 476-1200 or click here for more information.

Retablos

Retablos

The Museum of Spanish Colonial Art (750 Camino Lejo), whose purpose is to preserve and perpetuate the Hispano art forms that have been produced in New Mexico and Southern Colorado since the region was colonized by Spain in 1598, has 3,000 objects, making their collection the most comprehensive compilation of Spanish Colonial art of its kind.  Call 505 982-2226 or click here for more information.

 

 

Finally, there is the Wheelwright Museum of the American Indian (704 Camino Lejo) which opened in 1937 and came into being as a result of the special friendship between Mary Cabot Wheelwright, an East Coast heiress, and Hastiin Klah, a Navajo medicine man. To read more about the fascinating story of the Wheelwright Museum and what happened to its original collection, click here.

Toadalena Navajo rug from the Two Grey Hills area

Toadalena Navajo rug from the Two Grey Hills area

If you go to the Wheelwright Museum, do not forget to stop by The Case Trading Post, Santa Fe’s oldest Indian art gallery, which was built to resemble a turn-of-the-century Navajo Reservation trading post.  It is a wonderful shop where you can buy genuine works of art from contemporary Indian artists in the form of pottery, jewelry, textiles, storytellers, katsina dolls, and more. You’ll find pieces by recognized masters as well as new and emerging talent.

Homes for Sale in the Museum Hill Neighborhood

If you would like to explore homes for sale in the Museum Hill neighborhood or receive a free market analysis of how much your Museum Hill neighborhood home is worth, contact me, Karen Meredith, Keller Williams Realty, by e-mail or at (505) 603-3036.  

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Winter Salad

Winter Salad

Santa Fe New Mexico Living – Winter Recipes 

It is apple season at the Farmers Market!  Here is an easy and delicious winter salad recipe using apples, dried cranberries and pumpkin seeds:

Apple, Cranberry, and Goat Cheese Salad (adapted from the New York Times)

½ cup pumpkin seeds
½ teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon olive oil
1/3 cup dried cranberries
¼ cup extra virgin olive oil
1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar
Finely grated zest of half an orange
1 large apple or 2 small apples
Mesclun salad mix
1 6 ounce log of goat cheese (preferably on the drier side to facilitate crumbling – the house brand at Whole Foods works well)

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.  Toss pumpkin seeds with the ½ teaspoon olive oil and salt in a bowl.  Spread on baking sheet and toast in oven until golden brown and popped, 8 to 10 minutes (set a timer so you don’t forget about them!).  Set aside to cool.  Once cool, place the pumpkin seeds and cranberries together in a large salad bowl.
  1. In a second bowl, combine the ¼ cup extra virgin oil olive, vinegar and zest.  Season to taste with salt and pepper. Whisk until emulsified.
  1. Just before serving, cut apples in half, scoop out core using a melon baller if you have one, slice apples thinly and add to large salad bowl.  Add the lettuce and dressing and toss to mix.  Plate the salad and then crumble the goat cheese onto the plates.

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