Tag Archives: Karen Meredith Keller Williams

What Other People Are Saying About Santa Fe

Santa Fe is a world class destination market.  With a rich culture history, fanstastic art museums and galleries, abundant natural beauty, an internationally renowned opera and some of the best and most unique dining available anywhere, there’s something for everyone to experience and enjoy.  Read more about what makes Santa Fe, the City Different, so special and start planning your next visit today. Maybe like so many other visitors, you’ll also fall in love with this unique city and decide to make it your next home!

What other people are saying about Santa Fe:




Santa Fe Neighborhoods – Focus on Tesuque

Santa Fe Neighborhoods – Focus on Tesuque

Tesuque is a neighborhood located 5 miles north of Santa Fe, east of Highway 285 on Bishops Lodge Road.  Tesuque is known for its beauty, verdant landscape and traditional adobe structures.  Tesuque owes its grassy fields and leafy orchards to Tesuque Creek which runs the length of the village. Many acequias nourish the yards of the houses that line the creek, creating a green oasis in the middle of a high country desert.  Abundant trees such as cottonwoods along the banks of the creek provide residents with soothing cool shade in the summer.

At the 2010 Census, Tesuque had a population of 925 with 718 housing units in a land area of 6.96 sq. miles giving it a population density of 162.63 people per square mile. The median household income as of the 2010 census was $104,487 and the average age was 56.3. Tesuque has its own post office and an elementary school.  

Local Amenities and Attractions
Tesuque Village Market

Tesuque Village Market

The popular Tesuque Village Market sits in the center of the village.  Built to resemble a trading post and stocked with grocery items, it serves breakfast, lunch and dinner 7 days a week.    Outdoor dinning on the porch (weather permitting) provides diners with entertaining people watching.  The breakfast burritos and green chile are particularly noteworthy at Tesuque Village Market and the pasteries are delicious.

Fresh pasteries at Tesuque Village Market

Fresh pasteries at Tesuque Village Market

Tesuque’s other restaurant El Nido is currently closed. El Nido, built in the 1920s, has a colorful history.  It first started out as a roadhouse and dance hall and was reputed to have been a brothel at one point.  In the past El Nido was popular with opera goers due to its proximity to the Santa Fe Opera.

Tesuque is also home to one of the top bronze art foundries in the United States, Shidoni Foundry, which was established in 1971.  Shidoni pours 3,500 pounds of bronze per week to make their bronze sculptures.  Shidoni holds weekly public demonstrations on sculpture making. Call (505) 988-8001 for the pouring schedule and plan to arrive a little early.  The pouring starts when the bronze is heated to 2000 degrees and ready to be poured into ceramic shells, which can be up to half an hour before the scheduled time.

Glass Flowers

Glass Flowers

The foundry has an 8 acre outdoor sculpture gallery showcasing sculptures in styles ranging from contemporary to traditional as well as two indoor galleries. Also on site is the Shidoni Arts Gallery which features works in glass and wood and Tesuque Glassworks where visitors can watch daily glassblowing demonstrations.

Tesuque Pueblo lies north and west of Tesuque, just 9 miles north of Santa Fe.  Archeologists believe that this pueblo has existed since at least 1,200 A.D.  Comprised of just 424 residents, this tiny pueblo is one of the most traditional Tewa speaking pueblos, with a great reverence for its traditional religious ceremonies.  Their dances are known for their authenticity and costumes.  Public dances include the Kings Dance held in January, the Corn Dance held in June, Harvest Dance held in November and the Deer and Buffalo Dances held in December.  The pueblo is closed to the public during certain days of the year, so call the pueblo before planning to visit. (505) 983-2667.

Tesuque Pueblo also operates the Tesuque Pueblo Flea Market, 6.5 miles north of Santa Fe, just off U.S. 84/285 at Exit 171, next to the Santa Fe Opera every weekend (Friday, Saturday and Sunday) from March to December.  Call (505) 670-2599 for more information


If you would like to know more about homes for sale in the Tesuque neighborhood or for a free market analysis of what your Tesuque neighborhood home is worth, contact me, Karen Meredith, Keller Williams, by e-mail or at (505) 603-3036.    

Prices for homes in Tesuque currently range from the mid $400,000s to several million dollars.

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Santa Fe Neighborhoods – Focus on Bishops Lodge Road


Bishops Lodge Road
Bishops Lodge Road

Make a left on Paseo de Peralta onto Washington Avenue near the massive, pink, iconic Scottish Rite Temple and you find yourself heading north from the Santa Fe Plaza along the old stagecoach road to the Village of Tesuque.  Soon Washington Avenue turns into Bishops Lodge Road.  This 5 mile drive to Tesuque is one of the prettiest and most relaxing drives in Santa Fe. You’ll pass scenic hillsides and enter a cottonwood shaded lush valley filled with orchards and horse farms.  Along the way you will see some of the most expensive luxury homes in the Santa Fe style peppering the hillsides.

The Bishops Lodge Road neighborhood is one of Santa Fe’s older neighborhoods.  Well established, many of these homes enjoy beautiful views of the Sangre de Cristo, Jemez, Ortiz and Sandia mountain ranges as well as city light views.  Tucked away on dirt roads and nestled in the hillsides, these homes have privacy, yet are only minutes away from the Plaza.

Residents of Bishops Lodge Road have easy access to hiking in the Santa Fe National Forest, which has 1,500 contiguous square miles of territory nearby.

Bishop's Lodge Resort & Spa

Bishop’s Lodge Resort & Spa

Along the way to Tesuque you’ll pass the Bishop’s Lodge Ranch Resort & Spa, which was originally the home of Bishop Jean Baptiste Lamy.  Bishop Lamy was the first bishop appointed by the Vatican in 1850 for its newly created American southwest diocese, Vicariate of New Mexico.  He oversaw the creation of St. Francis Cathedral, at the end of East San Francisco Street, just off the Plaza, which he commissioned in 1869, and was very influencial in the development of Santa Fe and its surrounding areas in the mid 1800s.  The town of Lamy is named after Bishop Lamy for his work in bringing the railroad to that town and donating Church property for the railroad junction there.  Eventually becoming an Archbishop in 1875, Archbishop Lamy was the inspiration for the lead character in Willa Cather’s masterpiece, Death Comes for the Archbishop.

Horseback riding at Bishop's Lodge Ranch Resort & Spa

Horseback riding at Bishop’s Lodge Ranch Resort & Spa

Bishop’s Lodge Resort’s website states:  “Lamy enjoyed having visitors out to his lodge and his many guests were invited to partake in the pleasure of his gardens, orchard, fish-pond and the natural serenity of his country estate. In time, the path out to the ranch became a road and led the city’s newspaper to remark, “Good work has been done on the Bishop’s ranch road. It forms one of the best rides out of the city. This is the work, we presume, of Bishop Lamy.”

The New Mexico Governor’s Mansion also resides just off Bishop’s Lodge Road on 1 Mansion Way.  It was built in 1954 and is 7,949 square feet.

The Hills at Bishop’s Lodge is a new 45 acre residential luxury home and condominium development with amenities that include swimming, tennis and riding trails.

If you would like to know more about any of the homes for sale along Bishops Lodge Road neighborhood, or you would like a free market analysis of how much your home is worth, contact me, Karen MeredithKeller Williams Realty, by e-mail or at (505) 603-3036.

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Santa Fe Neighborhoods – Focus on Museum Hill

View from the Wheelwright Museum front terrace

View from the Wheelwright Museum front terrace

Santa Fe New Mexico Living– Focus on Museum Hill 

Santa Fe has four world class museums located on Camino Lejo on the southeast side of town in an area called Museum Hill.  If you limit your museum touring in Santa Fe to the cultural riches around the Plaza, you’ll be depriving yourself of a chance to view some wonderful art as well as magnificent views of the mountains.  Travel between Museum Hill and the Plaza is simple and convenient. Take the “M” line operated by Santa Fe Trails, which runs 7 seven days a week and costs adults $1 each way.  Departures start from the Downtown Transit Center on Sheridan Street (one block off the Plaza) for a short 18-minute ride.  Click here to see a map of the route.  Call 505 955-2001 for the most current information about schedules and fares.  You can spend endless hours exploring the wide variety of art in these collections.

Apache Mountain Spirit Dancer by Craig Dan Goseyun in front of the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture

Apache Mountain Spirit Dancer by Craig Dan Goseyun in front of the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture

The Museum of Indian Arts & Culture (710 Camino Lejo) covers 12,000 years of southwestern Native American culture and history in the long-term exhibit “Here, Now and Always”.  This groundbreaking exhibit, which opened in August, 1997, was developed over an eight year period by a curatorial team composed of Native American consultants and museum professionals.  It incorporates the voices of more than 50 Native Americans speakers and has over 1,000 artifacts and objects on display to help illustrate the rich, complex and diverse Native American stories of creation and survival in the Southwest.  Also on long-term display is the Buchsbaum Southwest Pottery Gallery which features 500 ceramic pieces from ancient times to today from each of the Pueblos of New Mexico and Arizona.  Call 505 476-1269 or click here for more information.

The Museum of International Folk Art (708 Camino Lejo) houses the largest collection of traditional folk art in the world.   With over 135,000 objects, the collection is displayed in four distinct wings and covers such diverse topics as folk art from Latin American mountain villages, metalwork from West Africa, intricate textiles from Southwest China and shadow-puppet traditions of Java.  Call 505 476-1200 or click here for more information.



The Museum of Spanish Colonial Art (750 Camino Lejo), whose purpose is to preserve and perpetuate the Hispano art forms that have been produced in New Mexico and Southern Colorado since the region was colonized by Spain in 1598, has 3,000 objects, making their collection the most comprehensive compilation of Spanish Colonial art of its kind.  Call 505 982-2226 or click here for more information.



Finally, there is the Wheelwright Museum of the American Indian (704 Camino Lejo) which opened in 1937 and came into being as a result of the special friendship between Mary Cabot Wheelwright, an East Coast heiress, and Hastiin Klah, a Navajo medicine man. To read more about the fascinating story of the Wheelwright Museum and what happened to its original collection, click here.

Toadalena Navajo rug from the Two Grey Hills area

Toadalena Navajo rug from the Two Grey Hills area

If you go to the Wheelwright Museum, do not forget to stop by The Case Trading Post, Santa Fe’s oldest Indian art gallery, which was built to resemble a turn-of-the-century Navajo Reservation trading post.  It is a wonderful shop where you can buy genuine works of art from contemporary Indian artists in the form of pottery, jewelry, textiles, storytellers, katsina dolls, and more. You’ll find pieces by recognized masters as well as new and emerging talent.

Homes for Sale in the Museum Hill Neighborhood

If you would like to explore homes for sale in the Museum Hill neighborhood or receive a free market analysis of how much your Museum Hill neighborhood home is worth, contact me, Karen Meredith, Keller Williams Realty, by e-mail or at (505) 603-3036.  

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Winter Salad

Winter Salad

Santa Fe New Mexico Living – Winter Recipes 

It is apple season at the Farmers Market!  Here is an easy and delicious winter salad recipe using apples, dried cranberries and pumpkin seeds:

Apple, Cranberry, and Goat Cheese Salad (adapted from the New York Times)

½ cup pumpkin seeds
½ teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon olive oil
1/3 cup dried cranberries
¼ cup extra virgin olive oil
1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar
Finely grated zest of half an orange
1 large apple or 2 small apples
Mesclun salad mix
1 6 ounce log of goat cheese (preferably on the drier side to facilitate crumbling – the house brand at Whole Foods works well)

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.  Toss pumpkin seeds with the ½ teaspoon olive oil and salt in a bowl.  Spread on baking sheet and toast in oven until golden brown and popped, 8 to 10 minutes (set a timer so you don’t forget about them!).  Set aside to cool.  Once cool, place the pumpkin seeds and cranberries together in a large salad bowl.
  1. In a second bowl, combine the ¼ cup extra virgin oil olive, vinegar and zest.  Season to taste with salt and pepper. Whisk until emulsified.
  1. Just before serving, cut apples in half, scoop out core using a melon baller if you have one, slice apples thinly and add to large salad bowl.  Add the lettuce and dressing and toss to mix.  Plate the salad and then crumble the goat cheese onto the plates.

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The City Different, Houston Chronicle, October 2, 2011

By MELISSA WARD AGUILAR, Houston Chronicle, published 12:01 a.m., Sunday, October 2, 2011

I spent my childhood summer vacations in Colorado. The long, hot drive to get there through Texas and New Mexico was utter chaos, with nine of us packed into an old Chevrolet Bel Air station wagon. We fought over who got the very back seat, where you could look out at where you had been instead of where you were going. We’d dangle our feet out the rear window. Did I mention there was no air conditioning?

Back then, I thought the scenery was pretty boring — until you got past Albuquerque. Somewhere along the highway to Santa Fe, or ”The City Different” as it’s known to visitors, the desert took on a magical glow. Silvery sagebrush dotted the pink landscape. Purple mountains rose in the background. Lonely abandoned adobe structures looked like props from a movie set.

Dad never wanted to stop along the way. It was a pretty expensive proposition to let seven kids loose in a Running Indian roadside store. He hated driving through Santa Fe; the highway routed you right through town. We would watch the shops and restaurants pass by, beckoning. The town looked like something from the past. It begged to be explored.   I vowed that when I grew up, I’d stop at every one of those spots.

I’ve been working on it. With nearly 300 galleries and 200 restaurants, it’s hard to distill the perfect itinerary. But if I were showing you around the Santa Fe area, here’s where we’d go:


Leroy Garcia has assembled a vibrant collection of contemporary American Indian artwork at Blue Rain, including work by his wife.  Tammy Garcia’s clay pots are amazing for their stature and beauty.  Schooled by her mother and grandmother at Santa Clara Pueblo, Garcia has forged a contemporary style in clay and bronze that honors her Indian heritage and challenges tradition, too.  The gallery also shows the intricate works of glass artist Preston Singletary, who has collaborated with bead and glass artist Marcus Amerman, both of whom are American Indians.

Nedra Matteucci Galleries is a beautiful place.  The rooms are filled with important historical and regional works from artists like E. Irving Crouse, Henry Balink and Gustave Baumann.  The sculpture garden, with pieces by Glenda Goodacre and Dan Ostermiller, includes a koi pond and waterfall.

Gerald Peters Gallery’s expansive pueblo houses a museum-quality collection of American masters. For the best of Southwest pottery, check out Andrea Fisher Gallery, which has works by the legendary Maria Martinez of San Ildefonso Pueblo and Nancy Youngblood, who carries on the Tafoya tradition.


I always try to visit my favorite flower painting, “Black Hollyhock Blue Larkspur” (1930) at the graceful Georgia O’Keeffe Museum, devoted to the artist whose studio is in Abiquiu, north of Santa Fe.

Gustave Baumann’s woodcut prints, on display through December, at the New Mexico Museum of Art aren’t to be missed either.  His landscapes include yellow aspens, lilac trees and mountain scenes in vivid colors.  The museum shop sells affordable posters of his very expensive prints.

The Poeh Museum at Pojaque Pueblo north of Santa Fe is devoted to the works of the Pueblo people, including artist Roxanne Swentzell.  Her expressive, whimsical sculptures illustrate the pueblo way of life. Swentzell’s work is for sale next door at the Tower Gallery.


Sure, the historical plaza is filled with tourists, but, face it:  That’s what we are.  It’s fun to window-shop at the upscale Packard’s on the Plaza.  But if I’m buying jewelry, I head to the Rainbow Man, which sells vintage and pawn turquoise as well as contemporary pieces. Be sure to ask what mine the stones are from. This is also the place to buy historical Edward S. Curtis photos.

Keshi, a co-op for arts and crafts from the Zuni Pueblo, has a vast menagerie of collectible carved animal fetishes, as well as artist Effie Calavaza’s snake pendants and rings.

It’s a mighty big brag, but Back at the Ranch boasts the world’s largest collection of handmade boots, made in El Paso.


The 3-mile trail at Kasha-Katwe Tent Rocks National Monument is home to fanciful volcanic rock formations and ribbons of narrow canyons. Climb to the top of the Canyon Trail for a view of the Rio Grande Valley and the Sangre de Cristo, Jemez and Sandia mountain ranges.  It’s on the Pueblo de Cochiti, 40 miles southwest of Santa Fe.

Back in Santa Fe, the half-mile hike up Canyon Road is enough exercise for some.  (Going in and out of the 100-plus galleries adds mileage.)  You’ll see everything from historical works and American Indian pieces to contemporary paintings and sculpture, folk art, jewelry and, of course, junk. Lots of restaurants line the stretch.  A favorite is the Garden at El Zaguan.  The Victorian cottage garden, tended by the Historic Santa Fe Foundation, is shady and inviting.

Bandelier National Monument is one of my favorite hiking spots. (Fire damage has temporarily closed most of the trails.)


For breakfast, Tia Sophia is delicious and reasonably priced.  Order your ”huevos rancheros” “Christmas” so you can try both red and green chiles.

For lunch, there’s El Ferol, Santa Fe’s oldest restaurant and saloon.  Sitting on the patio overlooking Canyon Road with a glass of Chilean wine and a crispy avocado, bacon and tomato ”bocadillo” is a pleasant respite from a day of gallery hopping.  Make reservations for the restaurant’s flamenco evening.

Another lunch favorite is Cafe Pasqual‘s, with its signature turquoise screen door facing the corner of Don Gaspar and Water streets.  Try the grilled chicken breast sandwich with manchego cheese on toasted chile bread. It’s Santa Fe comfort food.

For dinner, splurge at the Compound, Santa Fe’s most elegant restaurant.  James Beard Award-winning chef/owner Churches

The exquisite Loretto Chapel at the end of the Santa Fe trail is famous for its miraculous staircase, which makes two 360-degree turns and has no nails. Built in 1878, the chapel is now a private museum and concert venue.

Santuario de Guadalupe, built in 1781, houses the Archdiocese of Santa Fe’s collection of ”santos” — painted and carved images of saints — as well as a large oil painting of the Virgin of Guadalupe by Jose de Alzibar, one of Mexico’s 18th-century master painters, and the iconic 12-foot sculpture “La Virgen” by Mexican artist Georgina “Gogy” Farias.

The Cathedral Basilica of Saint Francis of Assisi towers over the historic district. Its Romanesque Revival style contrasts with this adobe city.

San Miguel Chapel, built between 1610 and 1626, is said to be the oldest church in the United States. It is currently undergoing restoration.

If you go

Andrea Fisher Gallery: 100 W. San Francisco, (505) 986-1234

Back at the Ranch: 209 E. Marcy, (888) 962-6687

The Compound: 653 Canyon Road, (505) 982-4353

El Farol: 808 Canyon Road, (505) 983-9912

Georgia O’Keeffe Museum: 217 Johnson St., (505) 946-1000

Gerald Peters Gallery: 1011 Paseo de Peralta, (505) 954-5700

Tent Rocks National Monument: 40 miles southwest of Santa Fe off
Interstate 25. Open year-round. No camping. Admission: $5 per car; (505)

Loretto Chapel: 207 Old Santa Fe Trail, (505) 982-0092

Nedra Matteucci Galleries: 1075 Paseo de Peralta, (505) 982-4631

New Mexico Museum of Art: 107 W. Palace, (505) 476-5041

Poeh Museum and Tower Gallery: 78 Cities of Gold Road, Pojaque, (505) 455-3334

Rainbow Man: 107 E. Palace, (505) 982-8706

St. Francis Cathedral: 131 Cathedral Place, (505) 982-5619

San Miguel Chapel: 401 Old Santa Fe Trail, (505) 983-3974

Santuario de Guadalupe: 100 N. Guadalupe, (505) 955-6200

Tia Sophia: 210 W. San Francisco, (505) 983-9880

Santa Fe Market Report – The Santa Fe City North West Area

The North West city area of Santa Fe includes the popular and affordable neighborhood of Casa Solana.  Built in the 1950s and 1960s by the well known and locally beloved developer Allen Stamm, Casa Solana has beautiful mature trees, sidewalks and paved streets.  Residents enjoy a neighborhood pool and convenient shopping at the Solana Center.  Homes here have the Stamm traditional features of vigas, hardwood floors, fireplaces and solid construction.

As you travel down West Alameda, newly constructed homes appear on larger, more open tracts.  Homes begin to spread out a bit and horse farms emerge to dot the landscape.  Some lots in the hills offer 360 degree views, while others have a beautiful view of the Santa Fe city lights.

Along US Hwy 84/285 at the exit for the world renowned Santa Fe Opera is Monte Sereno, one of Santa Fe’s newer neighborhoods.  Homes here enjoy breathtaking views of the majestic Sangre de Cristo and Jemez Mountain ranges on lots averaging 1.7 acres.

The North West city area also includes Zocolo, a residential condominium community of casita-style homes centered around small plazas.

If you would like to know more about any of the homes for sale in the Santa Fe City Northwest Area, contact me or if you would like a free market analysis of your home contact me, Karen Meredith, Keller Williams, by e-mail or at (505) 603-3036. 

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Santa Fe Neighborhoods – Focus on Bellamah

The Bellamah neighborhood is located in the southwest section of the City of Santa Fe.  Its boundaries are, in general,  West Rodeo Road to the south, Richards Avenue to the west, Cerrillos Road to the northwest, Siringo Road to the north and Yucca Street to the east.



In 1959, the City of Santa Fe annexed 600 acres so that  Dale Bellamah, the famous residential real estate developer and builder from Albuquerque, could build this neighborhood.   Bellamah began building homes in Albuquerque in 1947.  A booming post-war housing market and aggressive advertising led to his success.   His company, Dale Bellamah Homes, ultimately developed subdivisions in Albuquerque, Las Cruces, Hobbs,  Alamogordo, Las Vegas, and Santa Fe, New Mexico, as well as El Paso, Texas.

The Bellamah neighborhood features affordable, rectangular, one-story, suburban homes with elements of Santa Fe style on wide, curvilinear streets.   The homes are known for their logical floor plans, flat or pitched roofs, garages or car ports, larger lot sizes and many practical conveniences.

Bellamah’s advertisements touted the modern conveniences built into each home, such as an attached garage or car port and a garbage disposal.   These homes were designed to appeal to median income families.  Brochures promised a  house with conveniences to save the homemaker from the “drudgery of household chores”, which would  free up the homemaker’s time for family, self-development, and community activities.

“Advertising high quality construction at a value price, Bellamah began offering a money back guarantee on all home sales.  .  .  These homes were meant to be domestic retreats for working class and middle class families, and Bellamah had no trouble selling them.”  Source:  Rocky Mountain Online Archive.

Herb Martinez Park

Herb Martinez Park

Residents of Bellamah enjoy the many parks in the area, including General Franklin E. Miles, which is one of the largest parks in the city. General Franklin E. Miles has basketball courts, volleyball sand pits, children’s playgrounds, a skateboard area and grass for picnics.  Francis X. Nava Elementary School sits at the edge of the park at 2655 Siringo Road.  The Herb Martinez Park has tennis courts, a cement outdoor hockey area, a baseball field and grass that is often filled with soccer players.

The city’s popular Arroyo Chamisa hiking/biking trail is located in Bellamah, which runs from Rodeo Road past the Monica Lucero Park on Avenida de las Campanas and then passes across Camino Carlos Rey and ends at Yucca Street.   The Santa Fe University of Art and Design  borders the Bellamah neighborhood to the northeast.


If you would like to know more about any of the homes for sale in the Bellamah neighborhood or for a free market analysis of how much your Bellamah neighborhood home is worth, contact me, Karen Meredith, Keller Williams, by e-mail or at (505) 603-3036.

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Santa Fe Neighborhoods – Focus on Arroyo Hondo

My backyard in Arroyo Hondo

My backyard in Arroyo Hondo

Out of all the wonderful neighborhoods in Santa Fe,  Arroyo Hondo is one of the most special to me because it is my neighborhood.   Arroyo Hondo is a community of approximately 200 families located 7.5 miles from the Plaza in the southeast quadrant of the County.  Arroyo Hondo has a varied terrain of rolling hills, sheltered valleys and flat lots, many with excellent pinon and juniper tree cover.  Most homes in Arroyo Hondo enjoy expansive, wide open views of the mountains.

Arroyo Hondo’s boundaries are Old Las Vegas Highway to the east, the Arroyo Hondo itself to the north, the Santa Fe Southern Railway line to the west and Seton Village to the south.   The average lot size is over 9 acres and the average house size is approximately 3,400 square feet.  Most of the streets are dirt roads with very few overhead wires or street lights to interfere with our brillant northern New Mexico night skies.  Housing styles are primarily Pueblo Revival and pitched roof Northern New Mexico Territorial.

Another sunny blue sky day in Arroyo Hondo

Another sunny blue sky day in Arroyo Hondo

This rural neighborhood is known for being premier horse country and miles of riding trails weave in and around the area.  The Arroyo Hondo Trail Association is a residents’ organization that maintains the trail system.  Over half the neighborhood participates in the Arroyo Hondo Trail Association.  Click here for more about the history of Arroyo Hondo and the Arroyo Hondo Trail Association.

There is a strong sense of community in Arroyo Hondo and commitment to the rural, residential character of the neighborhood.  In 1992 Arroyo Hondo residents created the Arroyo Hondo Land Trust, a 501(c)(3) organization whose mission is to preserve the rural, residential character of the community.

Arroyo Hondo Canyon carved by the Arroyo Hondo

The canyon carved by the Arroyo Hondo

In 2002 Arroyo Hondo residents donated $300,000 to help Santa Fe County purchase 86 acres of wetlands for open space at the entrance to Arroyo Hondo, just off of Arroyo Hondo Road.  The Arroyo Hondo Open Space area is open to anyone for hiking and is home to numerous birds, mammals (such as deer, raccoons and bobcats),  frogs and other reptiles.  The hiking trails provide panoramic views of the Galisteo Basin, Cerrillos Hills, Sandia Mountains and Ortiz Mountains.

Arroyo Hondo is also home to the Arroyo Hondo Pueblo, one of the largest fourteenth century towns in the northern Rio Grande region and now a 20-acre preserve.  Archaeologists believe that Arroyo Hondo Pueblo was first established in the early 1300s AD.  The stone and adobe pueblo grew to over 1,000 rooms. The pueblo had two occupation periods:  1300-1345 AD and 1370-1425 AD.  Arroyo Hondo Pueblo was extensively investigated by The School of American Research in the 1970s. You can read some of the fascinating studies they published describing their findings by ordering them here.  The School of American Research transferred Arroyo Hondo Pueblo to the Archaeology Conservancy in 2003.  There will be a lecture on the Big Pueblo at Arroyo Hondo on May 19, 2011 presented by The School for Advanced Research (which is what The School of American Research is now called).

Tennis court at El Gancho

Tennis court at El Gancho

Arroyo Hondo residents benefit from their proximity to the El Gancho Fitness Swim & Racquet Club located at 104 Old Las Vegas Highway, which has the following features:

5,000 Square Foot Cardio and Strength Training Center
20 yd. Heated Indoor & Outdoor Pool (seasonal)
Hot Tubs
Gender specific Saunas and Steam Rooms
2 Racquetball/ Squash Courts
Cushioned Aerobafloor Group Exercise Studio
15 bike Cycling Studio
7 Outdoor Tennis Courts
2 Indoor Climate-controlled Tennis Courts
Poolside Deli at the Outdoor Pool (seasonal)

Steaksmith at El Gancho  is located next door to the fitness, swim and racket club and features aged beef, seafood and ribs.  Steaksmith is known for its outstanding prime roast beef and margaritas.

Other local amenities include:

Harry’s Road House, another popular restaurant located at 96 B Old Las Vegas Highway, and

Sunrise Grocery, which also has a gas station at 52 Old Las Vegas Highway, and

For a fun sightseeing adventure that gives you an excellent view of the Arroyo Hondo neighborhod consider a train ride on the Santa Fe Southern Railway, a 129 year old spur track from Lamy to Santa Fe that passes along Arroyo Hondo’s southern boundary.

Homes for sale in the Arroyo Hondo neighborhood

If you would like to know more about any of the homes for sale in the Arroyo Hondo neighborhood or for a free market analysis of how much your Arroyo Hondo home is worth, contact me, Karen Meredith, Keller Williams, by e-mail or at (505) 603-3036.

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Santa Fe Neighborhoods – Focus on Eldorado

Santa Fe New Mexico Living– Focus on Eldorado

Eldorado 005Eldorado at Santa Fe  (Eldorado) is a well established community of approximately 2,700 lots located 14 miles southeast of the Santa Fe Plaza.  Eldorado’s attractive physical setting, large areas of protected open space, recreational amenities, reasonable prices and convenience to Santa Fe have made it a popular place to live in the Santa Fe area.

According to the United States Census Bureau, Eldorado, as a census-designated place, had a total area of 20.8 square miles, a population of 6,130 and 2,895 households according to the 2010 census.

The minimum acreage for lots in Eldorado is 1 acre with the majority of homes being built on 1 to 2 acre lots in the pueblo style which blends nicely into the landscape.  Prices generally range from the mid $200,000s to the mid to high $600,000s.

Eldorado Community Center

Eldorado Community Center

Eldorado has a much used Community Center which averages 40 to 50 events per week according to the Eldorado Community Improvement Association (ECIA).  Groups using the Community Center include the boy scouts, the girl scouts, bridge groups, seniors and a children’s theater group.

The Vista Grande Public Library has a variety of programs for adults and children and enjoys active community support.  In August 2009, the Tenth Annual Ice Cream Social raised $17,000 for the library.

One of Eldorado's community biking trails

One of Eldorado’s community biking trails

There are greenways and parks scattered throughout Eldorado which contribute to the open space feel of the area.  Residents can also enjoy the volleyball, basketball, handball and tennis courts, a baseball field, a soccer field, a pool, 14 miles of community hiking and biking trails running beside the roads through Eldorado and a community preserve of 4,094 undeveloped acres.   In addition to the community trails, the Santa Fe Rail Trail,  an 11.5 mile trail from the Santa Fe Southern Railroad Depot to near Lamy, New Mexico, passes directly through Eldorado.  Hikers, bikers and horseback riders can use the Santa Fe Rail Trail.

Finally, stables are available which currently house 80 horses.  The ECIA advises that the stables are popular with gardeners too because manure is free for residents who can help themselves to it.  Otherwise, twice a year the Stable Committee will load up residents’ vehicles with manure or deliver manure to residents’ houses for a small donation.

Commercial amenities in Eldorado include a shopping center with a large, well stocked supermarket, post office, bank, restaurants, flower shop, dog grooming, pharmacy, gym, doctor’s office and other health services.  A gas station and convenience store are located directly across from the main entrance to Eldorado and a hardware store is about a half mile north of the main entrance.

Eldorado History.  Eldorado lies within the Canada de los Alamos Grant, a Spanish land grant which dates back to 1785. As recorded in 1894, and patented by the US government, the size of the grant was about 12,068 acres.

The grant was operated as a cattle ranch by the Onderdonk Land & Cattle Company from 1901 to 1956 and by the Simpson family from 1956 until 1969.  In 1969 the American Realty and Petroleum Corporation (AMREP) bought the Simpson family out. AMREP proceeded to plat about 2,700 lots and develop about 6,000 acres of their purchase as Eldorado at Santa Fe, selling the first lots in 1972.  From 1972 until 1983 only about 200 homes were built, but after 1983 the pace of construction quickened and at present the Eldorado subdivisions are nearly built out with only a few vacant lots available.

Artist Tour. Many artists reside in Eldorado.  The Eldorado Arts and Crafts Association holds an annual two day studio tour each year, in mid-May, in which artists open their homes and studios to the public to showcase their art.  In its 19th year, the 2010 tour featured 117 artists in 83 studios, making it the largest studio tour in New Mexico. Sale items included traditional paintings, digital art, ceramics, textiles, wearable art, photography, sculpture and jewelry.

Artists contribute 5% of their sale proceeds from the tour to support the Eldorado Fire Department, the El Dorado Elementary School and the Vista Grande Public Library.   In the past 5 years the Eldorado Arts & Crafts Association has contributed approximately $15,000 to these organizations.

Beautiful homes at prices ranging from the mid $200,000s to the mid to high $600,000s are currently available in Eldorado.

If you are interested in seeing homes in the Eldorado neighborhood or you would like a free comparative market analysis to see how much it is worth contact me, Karen Meredith, Keller Williams, or call me at 505.603.3036.

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Santa Fe Neighborhoods – Focus on Aldea

Aldea Village Map

Aldea Village Map

Popular and affordable Aldea de Santa Fe is a relatively new planned 345 acre neighborhood close to downtown Santa Fe.  It is located Northwest of Santa Fe off of Highway 599 approximately 8 miles from Santa Fe Plaza and minutes from the world-famous Santa Fe Opera and the Tesuque Valley.  It is also only a few miles to the City Municipal Recreation Complex, including an award winning public golf course (watered with treated wastewater).

Created by world renowned designer and planner Andres Duany, this is village community living as most of the homes are clustered on small, low maintenance parcels. However, with 205 acres of perpetual open space, Aldea boasts extensive trails and walkways, picturesque parks and large areas of open space, including approximately 100 acres of open space on the Northwest side.  Aldea’s narrow roads mean slower moving vehicles, which further enhance the pedestrian friendly environment.

Click here for a map of Aldea de Santa Fe.  Extensive views of mountain ranges both east and west are available from many of the homes.

Aldea Plaza

Aldea Plaza

Aldea is built around a central plaza which houses the Community Building which was completed in the summer of 2005.  This building houses the Homeowners Association offices, and is available for community meetings, neighborhood gatherings, exercise classes and conferences.

As Aldea Plaza grows, it is designed to provide convenient commercial and retail services. Café Aldea is already a charming and convenient café providing breakfast and lunch daily and dinner from Thursday to Sunday.  It also hosts events such as poker nights on certain Wednesdays, kids games on certain Thursday nights and live music with singers and songwriters on certain Saturdays.  Check with Cafe Aldea for their schedule of events.

Outdoor patio at Cafe Aldea

Outdoor patio at Cafe Aldea

Aldea de Santa Fe has a home owners association which as its website states “provides community leadership, architectural control, covenant enforcement, community events, accounting and finance, operation and maintenance of recreation facilities.”

As the homeowners association’s own website states “People who want large lots, far from neighbors, are not attracted to Aldea. Aldea has been designed to facilitate the development of community. . . .The Aldea Design Code, created by Andres Duany along with local architects, works to produce attractive streetscapes that emphasize the public realm instead of calling attention to trophy houses. . . Not everyone desires a Village lifestyle, but those who do will be happy with Aldea’s virtues.”

If you would like to know more about any of the homes for sale in the Aldea neighborhood or if you would like a free market analysis of how much your Aldea home is worth, contact me, Karen Meredith, Keller Williams, by email or at (505) 603-3036.

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