Tag Archives: Santa Fe Living

What Other People Are Saying About Santa Fe

Santa Fe is a world class destination market.  With a rich culture history, fanstastic art museums and galleries, abundant natural beauty, an internationally renowned opera and some of the best and most unique dining available anywhere, there’s something for everyone to experience and enjoy.  Read more about what makes Santa Fe, the City Different, so special and start planning your next visit today. Maybe like so many other visitors, you’ll also fall in love with this unique city and decide to make it your next home!

What other people are saying about Santa Fe:

 

 

 

Santa Fe Neighborhoods – Focus on Tesuque

Santa Fe Neighborhoods – Focus on Tesuque

Tesuque is a neighborhood located 5 miles north of Santa Fe, east of Highway 285 on Bishops Lodge Road.  Tesuque is known for its beauty, verdant landscape and traditional adobe structures.  Tesuque owes its grassy fields and leafy orchards to Tesuque Creek which runs the length of the village. Many acequias nourish the yards of the houses that line the creek, creating a green oasis in the middle of a high country desert.  Abundant trees such as cottonwoods along the banks of the creek provide residents with soothing cool shade in the summer.

At the 2010 Census, Tesuque had a population of 925 with 718 housing units in a land area of 6.96 sq. miles giving it a population density of 162.63 people per square mile. The median household income as of the 2010 census was $104,487 and the average age was 56.3. Tesuque has its own post office and an elementary school.  

 
Local Amenities and Attractions
Tesuque Village Market

Tesuque Village Market

The popular Tesuque Village Market sits in the center of the village.  Built to resemble a trading post and stocked with grocery items, it serves breakfast, lunch and dinner 7 days a week.    Outdoor dinning on the porch (weather permitting) provides diners with entertaining people watching.  The breakfast burritos and green chile are particularly noteworthy at Tesuque Village Market and the pasteries are delicious.

Fresh pasteries at Tesuque Village Market

Fresh pasteries at Tesuque Village Market

Tesuque’s other restaurant El Nido is currently closed. El Nido, built in the 1920s, has a colorful history.  It first started out as a roadhouse and dance hall and was reputed to have been a brothel at one point.  In the past El Nido was popular with opera goers due to its proximity to the Santa Fe Opera.

Tesuque is also home to one of the top bronze art foundries in the United States, Shidoni Foundry, which was established in 1971.  Shidoni pours 3,500 pounds of bronze per week to make their bronze sculptures.  Shidoni holds weekly public demonstrations on sculpture making. Call (505) 988-8001 for the pouring schedule and plan to arrive a little early.  The pouring starts when the bronze is heated to 2000 degrees and ready to be poured into ceramic shells, which can be up to half an hour before the scheduled time.

Glass Flowers

Glass Flowers

The foundry has an 8 acre outdoor sculpture gallery showcasing sculptures in styles ranging from contemporary to traditional as well as two indoor galleries. Also on site is the Shidoni Arts Gallery which features works in glass and wood and Tesuque Glassworks where visitors can watch daily glassblowing demonstrations.

Tesuque Pueblo lies north and west of Tesuque, just 9 miles north of Santa Fe.  Archeologists believe that this pueblo has existed since at least 1,200 A.D.  Comprised of just 424 residents, this tiny pueblo is one of the most traditional Tewa speaking pueblos, with a great reverence for its traditional religious ceremonies.  Their dances are known for their authenticity and costumes.  Public dances include the Kings Dance held in January, the Corn Dance held in June, Harvest Dance held in November and the Deer and Buffalo Dances held in December.  The pueblo is closed to the public during certain days of the year, so call the pueblo before planning to visit. (505) 983-2667.

Tesuque Pueblo also operates the Tesuque Pueblo Flea Market, 6.5 miles north of Santa Fe, just off U.S. 84/285 at Exit 171, next to the Santa Fe Opera every weekend (Friday, Saturday and Sunday) from March to December.  Call (505) 670-2599 for more information

HOMES FOR SALE IN TESUQUE

If you would like to know more about homes for sale in the Tesuque neighborhood or for a free market analysis of what your Tesuque neighborhood home is worth, contact me, Karen Meredith, Keller Williams, by e-mail or at (505) 603-3036.    

Prices for homes in Tesuque currently range from the mid $400,000s to several million dollars.

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Santa Fe Neighborhoods – Focus on Museum Hill

View from the Wheelwright Museum front terrace

View from the Wheelwright Museum front terrace

Santa Fe New Mexico Living– Focus on Museum Hill 

Santa Fe has four world class museums located on Camino Lejo on the southeast side of town in an area called Museum Hill.  If you limit your museum touring in Santa Fe to the cultural riches around the Plaza, you’ll be depriving yourself of a chance to view some wonderful art as well as magnificent views of the mountains.  Travel between Museum Hill and the Plaza is simple and convenient. Take the “M” line operated by Santa Fe Trails, which runs 7 seven days a week and costs adults $1 each way.  Departures start from the Downtown Transit Center on Sheridan Street (one block off the Plaza) for a short 18-minute ride.  Click here to see a map of the route.  Call 505 955-2001 for the most current information about schedules and fares.  You can spend endless hours exploring the wide variety of art in these collections.

Apache Mountain Spirit Dancer by Craig Dan Goseyun in front of the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture

Apache Mountain Spirit Dancer by Craig Dan Goseyun in front of the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture

The Museum of Indian Arts & Culture (710 Camino Lejo) covers 12,000 years of southwestern Native American culture and history in the long-term exhibit “Here, Now and Always”.  This groundbreaking exhibit, which opened in August, 1997, was developed over an eight year period by a curatorial team composed of Native American consultants and museum professionals.  It incorporates the voices of more than 50 Native Americans speakers and has over 1,000 artifacts and objects on display to help illustrate the rich, complex and diverse Native American stories of creation and survival in the Southwest.  Also on long-term display is the Buchsbaum Southwest Pottery Gallery which features 500 ceramic pieces from ancient times to today from each of the Pueblos of New Mexico and Arizona.  Call 505 476-1269 or click here for more information.

The Museum of International Folk Art (708 Camino Lejo) houses the largest collection of traditional folk art in the world.   With over 135,000 objects, the collection is displayed in four distinct wings and covers such diverse topics as folk art from Latin American mountain villages, metalwork from West Africa, intricate textiles from Southwest China and shadow-puppet traditions of Java.  Call 505 476-1200 or click here for more information.

Retablos

Retablos

The Museum of Spanish Colonial Art (750 Camino Lejo), whose purpose is to preserve and perpetuate the Hispano art forms that have been produced in New Mexico and Southern Colorado since the region was colonized by Spain in 1598, has 3,000 objects, making their collection the most comprehensive compilation of Spanish Colonial art of its kind.  Call 505 982-2226 or click here for more information.

 

 

Finally, there is the Wheelwright Museum of the American Indian (704 Camino Lejo) which opened in 1937 and came into being as a result of the special friendship between Mary Cabot Wheelwright, an East Coast heiress, and Hastiin Klah, a Navajo medicine man. To read more about the fascinating story of the Wheelwright Museum and what happened to its original collection, click here.

Toadalena Navajo rug from the Two Grey Hills area

Toadalena Navajo rug from the Two Grey Hills area

If you go to the Wheelwright Museum, do not forget to stop by The Case Trading Post, Santa Fe’s oldest Indian art gallery, which was built to resemble a turn-of-the-century Navajo Reservation trading post.  It is a wonderful shop where you can buy genuine works of art from contemporary Indian artists in the form of pottery, jewelry, textiles, storytellers, katsina dolls, and more. You’ll find pieces by recognized masters as well as new and emerging talent.

Homes for Sale in the Museum Hill Neighborhood

If you would like to explore homes for sale in the Museum Hill neighborhood or receive a free market analysis of how much your Museum Hill neighborhood home is worth, contact me, Karen Meredith, Keller Williams Realty, by e-mail or at (505) 603-3036.  

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Winter Salad

Winter Salad

Santa Fe New Mexico Living – Winter Recipes 

It is apple season at the Farmers Market!  Here is an easy and delicious winter salad recipe using apples, dried cranberries and pumpkin seeds:

Apple, Cranberry, and Goat Cheese Salad (adapted from the New York Times)

½ cup pumpkin seeds
½ teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon olive oil
1/3 cup dried cranberries
¼ cup extra virgin olive oil
1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar
Finely grated zest of half an orange
1 large apple or 2 small apples
Mesclun salad mix
1 6 ounce log of goat cheese (preferably on the drier side to facilitate crumbling – the house brand at Whole Foods works well)

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.  Toss pumpkin seeds with the ½ teaspoon olive oil and salt in a bowl.  Spread on baking sheet and toast in oven until golden brown and popped, 8 to 10 minutes (set a timer so you don’t forget about them!).  Set aside to cool.  Once cool, place the pumpkin seeds and cranberries together in a large salad bowl.
  1. In a second bowl, combine the ¼ cup extra virgin oil olive, vinegar and zest.  Season to taste with salt and pepper. Whisk until emulsified.
  1. Just before serving, cut apples in half, scoop out core using a melon baller if you have one, slice apples thinly and add to large salad bowl.  Add the lettuce and dressing and toss to mix.  Plate the salad and then crumble the goat cheese onto the plates.

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American Lung Association Reports Santa Fe Air Ranks Among the Country’s Cleanest

By Staci Matlock | The New Mexican
Posted: Sunday, April 22, 2012  To read the original article in its entirety.

Breathe deeply, Santa Feans.

The City Different and Santa Fe County has some of the cleanest air in America, according to the American Lung Association.

That’s excellent news for children, elderly and people with asthma, cardiovascular disease and emphysema who are most at risk of health problems when they breath polluted air. An estimated third of Santa Fe County’s population falls into one of those categories.

The association analyzed data from 2007 to 2010 related to ozone and particles emitted from vehicle tailpipes, power generating stations, mining, manufacturing and more. The association has analyzed air quality in U.S. cities for the last dozen years and published the results in annual State of the Air reports.

The reports rank cities based on levels of ozone, short-term particle pollution and long-term particle pollution. Santa Fe joined Honolulu as the only cities who were on the association’s “cleanest air” list in all three categories from 2007-2010, the period for which data was analyzed.

Santa Fe earned an A for low ozone and 24-hour particle pollution, and it passed the annual particle pollution category.

Particles are mixtures of chemicals and materials floating around in air. Some are so tiny they can’t be seen without an electron microscope. Some are thinner than a strand of hair.

Smoke, dust, pollen and gas fumes are just a few of the particles launched into the air by wind, plants, power generation and wildfires. People inhale the particles with air. People cough out the larger particles, but smaller particles can get trapped in lung tissue, causing illness.

Ozone, another dangerous lung irritant analyzed by the American Lung Association, also comes from a mixture of gases produced by cars, smokestacks and burning coal. The gases — nitrogen oxides and volatile organic compounds — when combined with sunlight and warmth, produce harmful ozone in the lower atmosphere.

Children, people older than 65, those who like to exercise outdoors and people who have existing lung problems such as asthma are more susceptible to the ill effects of elevated ozone levels. People exposed to high levels of ozone can suffer wheezing, chest pain, asthma attacks and respiratory infections.

The American Lung Association report notes that while air quality has improved overall around the country, 1 in 17 Americans (18.5 million total) live around unhealthy levels of ozone and particles.

Biscochitos – New Mexico State Cookie is Seasonal Favorite

SANTA FE, N.M.  –  In a town known for upscale New Mexican cuisine, the best holiday dishes might be the simplest.

Biscochitos served at the La Fonda Hotel in Santa Fe, NM by Ashley Parrish, Tulsa World

Biscochitos served at the La Fonda Hotel in Santa Fe, NM by Ashley Parrish, Tulsa World

By:  Ashley Parrish, World Scene Editor, Tulsa World, published 12/18/11.  This article was syndicated from the Tulsa World, click here for the original article.

Tamales are traditional. Cover them in red and green chile and they’re even called “Christmas-style,” although the term is used year-round.

And then there are Biscochitos.

Home cooks and bakers alike make batches of the thin shortbread cookies at Christmas. Diamonds, rounds, they come in all shapes. But they’re always mildly flavored with anise seeds and liquor and are finished in cinnamon sugar.

The state cookie of New Mexico is traditionally made with lard, and many natives won’t stand for substitutes. But this recipe from the Santa Fe Cooking School allows for vegetable shortening. It won’t be quite as traditional but is still delicious.

Holiday Biscochitos

Makes 4 to 5 dozen cookies

1 pound (2 cups) lard or vegetable shortening
1  1/2 cups sugar
2 eggs
2 teaspoons toasted anise seeds
6 cups flour
3 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup brandy

1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.

2. Cream the lard, or shortening. Add sugar, eggs and anise seeds and cream again. Mix dry ingredients separately and combine with the shortening mixture. Add the brandy and mix thoroughly.

3. Roll the dough out on a floured surface and cut into desired shapes. Sprinkle the cookie shapes with the sugar-cinnamon mixture and bake for 12 to 15 minutes until lightly browned.

–  Courtesy Santa Fe School of Cooking

Santa Fe Neighborhoods – Focus on the Santa Fe Railyard

Santa Fe New Mexico Living– Focus on the Railyard

Farmers Market at the Railyard

Farmers Market at the Railyard

One of the joys of living in Santa Fe is being able to shop at the twice weekly Farmers Market that takes place at the Railyard (intersection of Paseo de Peralta and S. Guadalupe Street) every Tuesday and Saturday from 8:00 am to noon. The Farmers Market offers hungry Santa Feans a cornucopia of healthy, local food choices from over 100 active vendors.  One Farmers Market rule is that all of the vegetables, fruits and nursery plants sold there must be grown in northern New Mexico.  The same is true for at least 80% of the ingredients and materials used to make all processed and craft items.

The difference in flavor, aroma and texture between locally grown fruits and vegetables and their supermarket counterparts can be dramatic. This time of year you can find fresh roasted red and green chile, pumpkins, greens, apples, eggplants, herbs, root veggies, eggs, cheeses, grassfed meats, baked goods, fresh-cut flowers, dried foods, original crafts, body care and lavender products at the Farmers Market.

 

Antonio and Molly Manzanares with their daughter-in-law (right) at their booth at the Farmers Market

Antonio and Molly Manzanares with their daughter-in-law (right) at their booth at the Farmers Market

Recently we decided to investigate ordering a whole lamb from Shepherd’s Lamb, one of the Farmers Market free range and grassfed meat vendors.  At $6.99 a pound carcass weight, it seemed like an opportunity to get a higher quality product at an affordable price, including hard to find cuts like the shoulder and ribs.  Joseph Wrede of the restaurant Joseph’s Table in Taos revealed that Shepherd’s Lamb is one of his favorite local products in Food & Wine Magazine.

Shepherd’s Lamb, owned by Antonio and Molly Manzanares, is located in Tierra Amarilla, in northern New Mexico.  The Manzanares’ write on their website that their “flock grazes on lush native mountain grasses (wheat grass, grama and fescues) and their favorite shrubs, such as mountain mahogany and snowberry. Another favorite feed of the lambs is plumajillo (yarrow). While on summer pasture, the flock and the shepherd’s camp are moved to a new location weekly. This allows the ewes and lambs to have access to fresh feed at all times and ensures the long term good health of the range.”

 

Shepherd's Lamb flock enjoying the free range

Shepherd’s Lamb flock enjoying the free range

Best of all Shepherd’s Lamb is Certified Organic which means their lambs “are 100% free of genetically modified organisms, pesticides, medications, and growth hormones.”  You can read more about how they raise their sheep and why it is so good for you here.

The website said that a full lamb would be approximately 45 to 55 pounds in carcass weight. Inspired by what we had read, we filled out the order chart which allows you to custom order some of the cuts of lamb and faxed it in.

Approximately 2 ½ weeks after we ordered our lamb, it was available for pickup at the Manzanares’ booth at the Farmers Market in two medium sized cardboard boxes and packed fresh in plastic bags suitable for the freezer.

Our lamb had a carcass weight of 49.5 pounds and yielded the following cuts of meat at a total cost of $346:

–        2  pounds ground lamb (in 2 one pound packages)

–        2.68 pounds lamb loin chops (in a 1.28 pound package and a 1.40 pound package)

–        2 pounds stew meat (in 2 one pound packages)

–        .60 pounds lamb sirloin

–        1 pound lamb arm chops

–        6.3 pounds boneless lamb shoulder (in a 3.6 pound package and a 2.7 pound package)

–        4.2 pounds rack of lamb (in two 2.1 pound packages)

–        11.3 pounds leg of lamb (in a 4.7 pound package and a 6.6 pound bone in package)

–        3.3 pounds lamb shanks (in a 1.3 pound package and a 2 pound package)

–        1.3 pounds lamb neck

–        3.16 pounds lamb ribs (in a .72 pound package, a .84 pound package and a 1.6 pound package)

Santa Fe New Mexico Living – Homes for Sale in the Railyard neighborhood 

If you are interested in living in the Railyard neighborhood, contact me, Karen Meredith, Keller Williams Realty, by e-mail or call me at (505) 603-3036 to see a list of homes for sale in the Railyard neighborhood.  I would be happy to show you any of the homes in the Railyard neighborhood.  If you have a home for sale in the Railyard neighborhood and would like a free comparative market analysis to see how much it is worth, click here.

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Santa Fe Neighborhoods – Focus on Sunlit Hills

Sunlit Hills

Sunlit Hills

Located in the Old Las Vegas Highway Corridor (along Old Las Vegas Highway to Highway 285 south) and approximately 9 miles southeast of the Santa Fe Plaza, Sunlit Hills is a community of approximately 300 homes set in a rural location on primarily dirt roads.  Most lots in Sunlit Hills average 5 acres or more. Sunlit Hills has a rolling terrain of hills and ridges, many with excellent pinon and juniper tree cover.  Not surprisingly, most homes in Sunlit Hills either sit on a sun soaked hill top with wonderful vistas or in a shallow valley with beautiful light and color.

Sunlit Hills enjoys the services of the Sunlit Hills Water District (which also services Hondo Hills), eliminating the need for private wells in most cases.  It also benefits from having few street lights to interfere with our brilliant northern New Mexico night skies.

Tennis Court at El Gancho

Tennis Court at El Gancho

Sunlit Hills also benefits from its proximity to the El Gancho Fitness Swim & Racquet Club located at 104 Old Las Vegas Highway, which has the following features:

5,000 Square Foot Cardio and Strength Training Center
20 yd. Heated Indoor & Outdoor Pool (seasonal)
Hot Tubs
Gender specific Saunas and Steam Rooms
2 Racquetball/ Squash Courts
Cushioned Aerobafloor Group Exercise Studio
15 bike Cycling Studio
7 Outdoor Tennis Courts
2 Indoor Climate-controlled Tennis Courts
Poolside Deli at the Outdoor Pool (seasonal)

Steaksmith at El Gancho is located next door to the fitness, swim and racket club and features aged beef, seafood and ribs.  Steaksmith is known for its outstanding prime roast beef and margaritas.

Other local amenities include:

Harry’s Road House, another popular restaurant located at 96 B Old Las Vegas Highway, and

Sunrise Grocery, which also has a gas station located at 52 Old Las Vegas Highway.

Homes for Sale in Sunlit Hills

If you would like to know more about any of the homes for sale in the Sunlit Hills neighborhood or for a free market analysis of how much your home is worth, contact me, Karen Meredith, Keller Williams, by e-mail or at (505) 603-3036. 

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Carne Adovada

CARNE ADOVADA

Serves 6 to 8.

Note: From “The Rancho de Chimayo Cookbook,” by Cheryl Alters Jamison and Bill Jamison.

  • •8 oz. (about 25) whole dried red chile pods, preferably Chimayo or other New Mexico red, or ancho
  • • 4 c. water, divided
  • • 1 tsp. minced white onion
  • • 1/2 tsp. Worcestershire sauce
  • • 1/2 tsp. dried oregano
  • • 1/2 tsp. salt
  • • 1/4 tsp. white pepper
  • • 3 lb. boneless pork chops, trimmed of fat and cut into 1- to 2-in. cubes
  • • Lettuce and tomatoes, optional, for garnish

Directions:

To prepare sauce: Preheat oven to 300 degrees. Break stems off chile pods and discard seeds. It is not necessary to get rid of every seed, but most should be removed. Place chiles in sink or large bowl, rinse carefully and then drain.

Place damp pods in 1 layer on baking sheet and roast 5 minutes in oven. Watch pods carefully so they don’t burn. The chiles can have a little remaining moisture. Remove from oven and let cool. Break each chile into 2 or 3 pieces.

In blender, purée half of pods with 2 cups water. Pour liquid into large, heavy saucepan. Repeat with remaining pods and water.

Add onion, Worcestershire, oregano, salt and white pepper to chile purée and bring to boil over medium-high heat. Simmer 20 minutes, stirring occasionally. Mixture will be thickened, but should remain a bit soupy. Remove from heat. Set aside.

To prepare meat: In a large oiled baking pot with lid, pour enough sauce over bottom of pot to fully cover. Top evenly with pork cubes. Pour remaining sauce over pork. There should be more sauce than meat.

Cover pot and bake at 300 degrees until meat is tender and sauce cooks down, about 31/2 hours. Check meat after 3 hours. The carne adovada can be left uncovered for the last few minutes of baking if sauce seems watery.

Garnish with lettuce and tomato on side, if desired. Sauce can be made in advance and refrigerated for a day. The completed recipe can be refrigerated for up to 3 days. Add a couple tablespoons water before reheating in oven or top of stove

Santa Fe Guacamole

guacamoleIngredients:

  •  2-3 medium to large-sized avocados, halved and seeded
  •  3 tbsp freshly squeezed lime juice
  •  1 clove garlic, finely chopped
  •  1/3  cup red onion, finely chopped
  •  1 jalapeño chile, seeded and finely chopped
  •  1 small tomato, seeded and chopped small
  •  1/3 cup cilantro, finely chopped
  •  Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

Directions:

Cut each avocado in half. Remove the skin and seed and cut into 1/2-inch cubes.

Place all of the ingredients into a mixing bowl, season with salt and pepper and toss until all the ingredients are incorporated and the avocado is lightly mashed.  This guacamole is best when served on the chunky side.

Maria’s 100-Percent Agave House Margarita

margarita on the rocks with saltMakes 1 margarita

  • 1 lemon wedge
  • A saucer of kosher salt (about 1/4 -inch deep)
  • 1  3/4 ounces Jose Cuervo Traditional 100-percent agave tequila
  • 1 ounce Bols triple sec
  • 1  1/2 ounces freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • Ice

Run lemon wedge around the rim of hurricane-style margarita glass. Dip rim of glass into saucer of salt, rotating rim in salt until desired amount collects on glass.

Measure tequila, triple sec and lemon juice into 16-ounce cocktail shaker glass full of ice. Place stainless steel cocktail lid over shaker glass, tapping top to create seal. Shake vigorously about 5 seconds. Pour, ice and all, into salt-rimmed glass. To serve the margarita “up,” simply strain liquid from ice into flat margarita glass. Serve immediately.